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Quality Craftsmanship

Signs of Quality Tailoring: Jacket

COLLAR
Smooth and flat
against the neck.

HAND-STITCHING
At the collar and sleeve, stress points strategic to the fit. Stitches will be visible beneath the collar at the back of the neck, and around the inside arm hole. The more stitches per inch, the better quality the tailoring.

PATTERN
It should always line up without interuption across pockets and seams.

POCKETS
Cotton lining.

FABRIC
Soft and pliant to the touch.

LINING
In silky Bemberg, preferably full length.

LAPELS
A lack of lapel lining allows the wearer to fasten a three or four button jacket where ever he finds most flattering. Should lie perfectly flat without buckling.

SHOULDER
A soft suit has only the lightest of padding in the shoulder to create an easy sloping line, a characteristic that allows it to be worn without its matching trousers (as long as you wear it with some sort of trousers.)

SLEEVE
Set without puckering to hang slightly forward, tapering gently from the shoulder to the hem; neither too tight nor too full. Even when the jacket is without lining, sleeves still need to be lined with a quality silk or rayon for ease of movement.
 
 


Signs of Quality Tailoring: Slacks

RISE Measures from the crotch to the top of the waistband.
Measurements normally reflect a person's height (short, regular, long)
INSEAM Measures from the bottom of the crotch to the bottom of the cuff.
OUTSEAM Measures from the top of the waistband to the bottom of the cuff.
DROP The difference between chest and waist measurements.

 

SIDE POCKETS
Continental, or western, pockets are cut nearly parallel to the waistband. More common (and less casual) on-seam pockets run along the outer seams with a vertical or diagonal cut.

FLAT FRONT
Though generally informal, flat-fronted trousers also happen to be favored for suits by traditional men's shop tailors.

WIDTH
Jeans or fashion-forward pants may be more narrow at the ankles than suit pants.

BACK POCKET
Casual pants often have one besom pocket, usually with a button-flap closure.

CUFFS
Cuffs are usually 1 1/2"
wide – no less

WAISTBAND
On casual trousers they are softer, less constructed, and can either be non-rol with expandable sidetabs or have hook enclosures.

GRIP
A piece of fabric in the inside part of the waistband. Holds the shirt in place.

BELT LOOPS
Normally, trousers with expandable waists do not have belt loops.

PLEATS
Pleats can be "reverse" (folded inside) or "forward" (folded outside). Reverse pleats create a slender appearance – unless the pants are too tight, in which case the bulging pleats can actually make you look heavier.

BREAK
Cuffed pants should break slightly on the shoe.


Signs of Quality Tailoring: Shirt

COLLAR
Evenly stitched around
the edges.

FIT
Sufficient blousiness in the sleeve. Where it joins the cuff, fabric should be gathered into pleates, not tapered.

SPLIT-SHOULDER YOKE
A vertical seam down the youke on the bakc of the shirt.

PLACKET
A count of fourteen stitches per inch on a shirt's placket – the strip of fabric on which the buttons are sewn – indicates quality. Fewer than eleven per inch signals lesser quality.

LONG TAILS
Long enough to come together between the legs.

SINGLE-NEEDLE STITCHING
A more costly and time-consuming method of machine sewing that uses one needle to sew one side of a garment at a time, providing consistent, careful stitch. The faster less expensive method is to sew with double-needle stitching, working both sides of the garment at once, with a greater likelihood of puckering.

BUTTONS
Securely stitched for durability.

GAUNTLET BUTTON
An anachronistic button on the sleeve opening, above the cuff.

FRENCH CUFFS
To be worn with cuff links.

 

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